Romanian Ambassador, Wife,
Visit General Conference
100,000 Adventists in Romania “proof” of church’s value, Ambassador says
 
BY MARK A. KELLNER, News Editor
 
he presence of 100,000 Seventh-day Adventist Christians in Romania is “proof” that Adventism has “helped us with your presence in Romania and [with] what you have done,” declared Ambassador Adrian Vierita, Romania’s emissary to the United States, during a luncheon at the General Conference on March 12, 2009.
 
Vierita, who has held his post in Washington, D.C., for the past 14 months, met with Pastor Jan Paulsen, General Conference president, and other world church leaders before the luncheon meeting. The Seventh-day Adventist Church has roots in the nation going back to 1868 when pioneering Adventist preacher M.B. Czechowski spoke in the city of Pitesti. From those origins, a Romanian Adventist church arose, surviving the breakup of the onetime Transylvania, the First and Second World Wars, and the rise and fall of communism in post-war Romania.
 
ADVENTISTS HELPED: The presence of 100,000 Seventh-day Adventist Christians in Romania is “proof” that Adventism has “helped us with your presence in Romania and [with] what you have done,” declared Ambassador Adrian Vierita, Romania’s emissary to the United States, during a luncheon at the General Conference. [Photo: Rajmund Dabrowski/ANN]
Following the 1989 revolution, Adventist activity gained wider public accommodation in the country, and in welcoming Vierita, Pastor Paulsen said, “I want to thank you and your nation for recognizing human rights,” particularly in regard to religious freedom. He noted that Adventists operate more than 60 educational institutions in Romania, and that “education has always been a big value in the Seventh-day Adventist Church. We want to be more than [just] a community of faith.”
 
Paulsen told Vierita the church wanted to be “partners in nation building and community building. Please tell your government that anything we can do for the people of Romania we will be delighted to do that.”
 
Dr. John Graz, public affairs and religious liberty director for the world church, said that Adventism is recognized as an official church in Romania and expressed appreciation for that status. In introducing the Ambassador, Graz noted Mrs. Codrina Eugenia Vierita was also a counselor at the Romanian Embassy.
 
Vierita said, “I have a great respect and appreciation for the Seventh-day Adventist Church. [Your] Church is appreciated by the Romanian authorities.” Noting that many of the world church leaders at the luncheon had visited the nation, he continued, “What you have probably already felt is that you are most welcome in my country.”
 



 
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