The beliefs and sentiments expressed by those whose letters appear here are not necessarily shared by the Adventist Review or its editorial staff. These letters have been edited for clarity and length. -- Editors


Defender of the Faith
Cliff Goldstein has done it again! In “Changing the Debate” (Mar. 15, 2012) he hit the nail on the head.

Those with the narrow view [of origins] are the ones who try to fit the activities of the infinite God into a finite (and very narrow) Darwinian box. And why do so many Adventists and other Christians twist their brains into knots trying to blend the two concepts? I can think of only one reason: they have more faith in (so-called) science than they do in God’s word.

And why do they place their faith in the convoluted reasoning of evolutionary “prophets?” Could it be because they are afraid of being ridiculed by the majority? How else can one explain their almost frantic attempts to deny the abundant evidence against evolution?

Truth has always been rejected by the majority, so why should that bother them? As far as I know, the last time the majority of humankind was on the right side of things was when a large boat beached itself on some mountain in Turkey. And that was almost 4,500 years ago.

--Wally Sumner
Canaan, Maine



Clifford Goldstein’s latest column, “Changing the Debate,” was right on. I couldn’t agree more. The responses he mentioned probably referred to an earlier column in which he defended the literal interpretation of Genesis (an interpretation that Paul, Peter, and Jesus all shared).

It’s absurd to consider each of the “days” of creation as eons of time and try to fit that into the fourth commandment. It would read something like this: “The seventh million-year period is the Sabbath of the Lord.” Apparently Moses also was a literalist.

Darwinian evolution doesn’t hold up to the scrutiny of modern microbiologic science. The enzyme and protein systems in cells are far too complex to have ever evolved one slow step at a time. This is well stated by Michael Behe in his book Darwin’s Black Box, and further supported by Lee Strobel in his very good investigative work The Case for a Creator. Behe states that the complexity of the cell screams that there was intelligent design.

It’s good to have modern defenders of the Adventist faith, such as Clifford Goldstein.

--Jerry Fessler
Lodi, California



Hats off to Clifford Goldstein for again simplifying the arguments used against a literal, seven-day creation. The subterfuge is thick, but the truth clears it away. We stand with him!

We appreciate the Review. It’s a pleasure to scan it quickly online before I receive my copy in the mail. Blessings to all the hard working folk at our flagship Adventist magazine.

--Janyce House
Statesboro, Georgia



A Woman of Noble Character
I was happy to see the extensive space and story “Elly Economou, Andrews University Professor, Passes” (Mar. 15, 2012). She deserves all that and more.

Economou was a guest in our home many times, and we enjoyed many Sabbath afternoon walks and hikes together in Tennessee. She used to spend time at Little Creek Academy near Knoxville in order to have a quiet place to translate Ellen White’s books into Greek. Many times she prepared delicious Greek vegetables for us. We were much impressed with the character and personal devotion of both her mother and herself.

Once, when we visited Andrews many years ago, she found several of our friends who lived in the area and invited them to come to her home for a party. We were astounded that she would take such a personal interest in us, and be so kind and generous. We never forgot that beautiful evening in her lovely home with her and her dear mother.

She was always interested in our personal welfare, writing us notes of encouragement, always filling every available space on the sheet of paper. Our granddaughter, planning to attend Andrews University next year, was looking forward to visiting with our dear “Aunt Elly.”

She was an inspiration to us. We count it a blessed privilege to have known her, and we look forward to spending eternity with her in the new earth.

--Ruth Watson
Thousand Oaks, California



I remember Elly Economou as a gracious hostess. In the mid-1980’s when the Association of Adventist Women held its annual conference at Andrews University, we were invited to her home for Sabbath dinner. People crowded her living room, dining room, and enclosed porch. Many people helped put the dinner together. Silver platters were pulled from storage under beds. I didn’t know her well, but I was impressed with her lovely hospitality. She provided the setting for good conversation.

--Peggy Harris


A Matter of Lower Case and Upper Case
In reading the article “Unrest Over a Rest Day” (Feb. 9, 2012), I was a bit confused about what the unrest was about. I was confused about the sabbaths mentioned with the feasts in Leviticus and the seventh-day Sabbath.

Leviticus 23:27 tells how to keep the Day of Atonement on the tenth day of the seventh month. The first day was to be a sabbath (lower case) of solemn rest. On the ninth day there was to be another sabbath (lower case).

Verse 39 tells of the Feast of the First Fruits. Again, the first and last days were to be sabbaths (lower case).

Then in verse 38 they were to keep the Sabbath (upper case), as well as these other sabbaths (lower case).

All these feasts pointed to Jesus and His ministry. Colossians 2:14-17 indicate that these feasts and rituals pointing to Jesus were nailed to His cross; meaning that Jesus fulfilled them, and they no longer have to be observed. The apostle wrote: “Therefore do not let anyone judge you by what you eat or drink, or with regard to a religious festival, a New Moon celebration or a Sabbath day (lower case in KJV). These are a shadow of the things that were to come [Jesus’ death]; the reality, however, is found in Christ.”

The Review is an integral part of our Adventist heritage. I devour every item. I often want to reply to some, but this time I just had to.

--Trudi Charles
Maple Ridge, British Columbia






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