From Faith                                                                                                       [Main Story]
A young adult radio producer/expert blogger shares the reasons why she blogs.
 
his happened almost a year ago: A friend’s blog post got featured in an issue of Digital Life. During lunch, I received a call from him. “You’re not the only one whose blog is highlighted in the local newspapers!” he told me. “Now I’m in there too! And my feature is bigger than yours!”
 
Um . . . OK . . . you win . . . ?
 
Since when was this a competition? I’ve been blogging for almost three years. I don’t earn money from advertising nor derive ego boosts from tracking hits, so the number of readers my blog gets is irrelevant.
 
What I write may not always be humorous, or even smart. Yet, I believe in God’s providence—that someday, somehow, someone may just stumble across my little corner in cyberspace, read what I write, and be influenced by it.
 
I produce and host RadioYOUth for Hope 107 FM in Singapore, and also serve as Hope 107 FM’s Web site programmer/administrator. On RadioYOUth, which is a daily weekday program, you can expect contemporary Christian music, interviews, and giveaways. Being in the radio industry and maintaining the station’s Web site (and loving all things techy), it was natural for me to pick up blogging as a way to share my beliefs. I’m not trying to preach to anyone. Rather, I hope to share a bit of myself and encourage, challenge, and support people as they search for purpose in life.
 
Here’s a sample of a recent blog (November 6, 2006) that prompted some feedback:
 
COURAGE
It takes courage, loads of it, to challenge people with personal truth.
 
It’s easier to stick to theology. Tell someone that Christ is the Son of God; that there is a heaven; that Christ is the personification of love . . . people will accept them. They may not subscribe to the same belief, but they accept them.
 
But try telling someone that how they show they love God is more important than how much God loves them. Or that their behaviors are hurting the people around them. Or that the decision they’re making isn’t wise.
 
Suddenly, it’s not so easy.
 
Confronting people with personal truth challenges the trust and respect they have for you. It means risking being disliked and misunderstood. Risking their pride, twisting your desperate concern as ineffective and meddling. Perhaps even using your words as an excuse for running away from the things that will save their lives.
 
I am a people-pleaser, and I know I’m very susceptible to being held hostage to my fear of being misunderstood. . . . My brain understands that I cannot please everyone and healing is largely dependent on the other person’s own teachability. (“If you’re teachable, you’re fixable.”) My heart just needs a little time to catch up.
 
Even deeper still, burrowed in my damaged psyche lies the fear of being the catalyst for someone turning away from God. It’s a trump card that gets thrown down often, “The church is blah blah blah. That’s why I stopped going”; or “You say you’re a Christian, then why don’t you (insert the individual’s want here) for me?”
 
. . . It still takes courage.
 
God, I need courage.
 
____________________
Faith Toh  writes from Singapore.




 
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